Attitudes of Infertile Couples, Fertility Clinic Staff and Researchers toward Personhood of The Human Embryo in Iran

(Pages: 314-323)
Marjaneh Kayssan, M.Sc, 1Mahrokh Dolatian, Ph.D, 1,2,*Reza Omani Samani, M.D, 3,*Saman Maroufizadeh, M.Sc, 3
Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Medical Ethics and Law Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Department of Epidemiology and Reproductive Health, Reproductive Epidemiology Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Medical Ethics and Law Research Center, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Department of Epidemiology and Reproductive Health, Reproductive Epidemiology Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
* Corresponding Address: 1996835119 Department of Midwifery and Reproductive Health School of Nursing and Midwifery Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences TehranIran P.O.Box: 16635-148 Department of Epidemiology and Reproductive Health Reproductive Epidemiology Research Center Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine ACECR TehranIran Emails: mhdolatian@gmail.com, samani@royaninstitute.org
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Kayssan Marjaneh, Dolatian Mahrokh, Omani Samani Reza, Maroufizadeh Saman. Attitudes of Infertile Couples, Fertility Clinic Staff and Researchers toward Personhood of The Human Embryo in Iran. Cell J. 2017; 19(2): 314-323.

Abstract

Objective

After the introduction of assisted reproductive techniques, human embryos were officially introduced into laboratories and now thousands of them are cryopreserved in such settings. Embryonic stem cells and the future application of such cells in the treatment of disease opened the door to further research on human embryos. These developments raise many ethical issues, some of which have religious aspects. The main question is: what is the embryo? Should we consider it a human being? Thus, the purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes towards the personhood of the embryo.

Materials and Methods

In this cross sectional study, 203 infertile patients (n=406), 54 clinic staff and 49 embryo researchers, selected using convenience sampling at the Royan Institute, completed a questionnaire on personhood of human embryo. The questionnaire had been developed following qualitative research and had satisfied face and content validity tests.

Results

At the pre-implantation stage the majority of participants in all three groups considered the human embryo as "not a human being". Also, at the post-implantation stage of development, the majority of infertile couples and clinic staff considered the embryo as "not a human being" but, half the researchers (51%) considered the embryo in this stage as a "potential human". Half of the infertile couples considered the human fetus before ensoulment time (19th week of pregnancy according to the Shiite Islamic scholars) as "not-human being", while more than half of researchers (55.1%) considered it as a "potential human".

Conclusion

Ensoulment time is a major and important border for personhood. Most infertile couples and clinic staff consider the human embryo as "not a human being" but majority of all study participants considered the human fetus to be a complete human after ensoulment time.