Preimplantation Genetic Screening and The Success Rate of In Vitro Fertilization: A Three-Years Study on Iranian Population

(Pages: 467-475)
Mehdi Totonchi, Ph.D, 1,2,#Babak Babaabasi, M.Sc, 1,#Hadi Najafi, M.Sc, 1,3Mojtaba Rezazadeh Valojerdi, Ph.D, 4Poopak Eftekhari-Yazdi, Ph.D., 4Lila Karimian, M.Sc., 4Navid Almadani, M.D., 1Anahita Mohseni Meybodi, Ph.D., 1Morteza Kimiai, M.Sc., 1Mehri Mashayekhi, M.D., 5Tahereh Madani, M.D., 5Hamid Gourabi, Ph.D., 1,2,*
Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Departments of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran
Department of Embryology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Endocrinology and Female Infertility, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Genetics, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Stem Cells and Developmental Biology, Cell Science Research Center, Royan Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Technology, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Departments of Genetics, Faculty of Biological Sciences, Tarbiat Modares University, Tehran, Iran
Department of Embryology, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
Department of Endocrinology and Female Infertility, Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center, Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, ACECR, Tehran, Iran
*Corresponding Address: P.O.Box: 16635-148 Department of Genetics Reproductive Biomedicine Research Center Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine ACECR Tehran Iran Email:gourabi@royaninstitute.org

The first two authors equally contributed to this work.

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Totonchi Mehdi, Babaabasi Babak, Najafi Hadi, Rezazadeh Valojerdi Mojtaba, Eftekhari-Yazdi Poopak, Karimian Lila, Almadani Navid, Mohseni Meybodi Anahita, Kimiai Morteza, Mashayekhi Mehri, Madani Tahereh, Gourabi Hamid. Preimplantation Genetic Screening and The Success Rate of In Vitro Fertilization: A Three-Years Study on Iranian Population. Cell J. 2021; 22(4): 467-481.

Abstract

Objective

In vitro fertilization (IVF) is one of the most efficient approaches within the context of assisted reproductive technology (ART) to treat infertility. High pregnancy rates have become the major index of successful IVF in clinical studies. It is not clear yet which factors are certainly responsible for IVF success, as various outcomes were obtained in different IVF centers with different settings. In this study, we aimed to address controversies in the interpretation of promising results of IVF with respect to preimplantation genetic screening (PGS).

Materials and Methods

In this retrospective case series study, we built a dataset containing data from 213 IVF patient candidates for PGS (654 embryos) with blastomere biopsy at day 3 and trophectoderm biopsy in day 5, referred to Royan Institute, Tehran, Iran from 2015 to 2018. Next, the data were analyzed to find influential factors affecting success rate of ART cycles.

Results

Data analyses showed that regardless of PGS indications (ART failures, recurrent miscarriage, chromosomal abnormalities, etc.), the pregnancy rate is influenced by maternal and embryonic factors such as the age of mother as well as quantity and quality of transferred embryos. Furthermore, genotyping of embryos using array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) depicted the highest rate of chromosomal aberrations for chromosomes 1, 16 and 19 while the lowest frequency for chromosomes 11 and 17. Similarly, we detected 463 genetically abnormal embryos by aCGH, among which only 41.9% could be detected by classical fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) method.

Conclusion

This study not only highlighted the advantages of aCGH over the FISH method in detection of chromosomal abnormalities, but also emphasized the importance of genetic abnormality as an indication for determination of IVF success rate.