Dexmedetomidine Protects Human Renal Tubular Epithelial HK-2 Cells against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury by Inactivating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway

(Pages: 457-464)
Mingyu Zhai, M.D., Mingming Han, M.D., Xiang Huang, M.M., Fang Kang, M.D., Chengwei Yang, M.M., Juan Li, M.D., *
Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China
Department of Anesthesiology, The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC, Division of Life Sciences and Medicine, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, China
*Corresponding Address: Department of Anesthesiology The First Affiliated Hospital of USTC Division of Life Sciences and Medicine University of Science and Technology of China Hefei Anhui China Email:lijuan087@163.com
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Zhai Mingyu, Han Mingming, Huang Xiang, Kang Fang, Yang Chengwei, Li Juan. Dexmedetomidine Protects Human Renal Tubular Epithelial HK-2 Cells against Hypoxia/Reoxygenation Injury by Inactivating Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Pathway. Cell J. 2021; 23(4): 457-464.

Abstract

Objective

The study was aimed to investigate the effects and potential mechanisms of Dexmedetomidine (Dex) on hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R) injury in human renal tubular epithelial HK-2 cells.

Materials and Methods

In this experimental study, HK-2 cells were divided into four groups: control group, Dex group, H/R group, and Dex+H/R group. The cells in control group received no treatment, and cells in Dex group were only treated with 0.1 nmol/L Dex. The cells in H/R group and Dex+H/R group were all treated with H/R (hypoxia for 24 hours and normoxia for 4 hours), and only the cells in Dex+H/R group were pre-administrated with 0.1 nmol/L Dex. Following treatments at 37˚C for 28 hours, cell viability and apoptosis were measured by MTT assay and flow cytometry, respectively. Also, the expressions of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP), caspase-12 and cleaved caspase-3 were determined by western blot.

Results

The cell viability was significant decreased in H/R group compared with control group (P<0.05), while was significantly increased in Dex+H/R group compared with that in H/R group (P<0.05). However, the change tendency of the cell apoptosis was opposite to that of cell viability. Compared with H/R group, the expression of HIF-1α was evidently up-regulated, while GRP78, CHOP, capase-12 and cleaved caspase-3 expressions were all obviously down- regulated in Dex+H/R group (P<0.05). In addition, the concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA) in H/R group and Dex+H/R group were 1.68 ± 0.22 nmol/mgprot and 0.85 ± 0.16 nmol/mgprot, respectively. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity was higher in Dex+H/R group (121 ± 11 U/L), which which was more than twice larger than that in H/R group (57 ± 10 U/L).

Conclusion

Dex could promote cell viability and inhibit apoptosis through up-regulating HIF-1α, reducing endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and mediating oxidative stress, thus ameliorating the H/R injury.